Effective Interventions with Offenders – New Stock has arrived

Effective interventions cover 2

The view of the 1970s and ’80s – that in terms of rehabilitation programmes, nothing works – continues to exert an influence that is no longer deserved. Over the last twenty years more than 2,000 published evaluations and 75 meta-analyses have shown that carefully designed and delivered interventions, supported by good supervision, at their best make a real difference to the reoffending rates. Their effectiveness is comparable to that of counselling for mental health issues.

What are the keys to an effective programme? One thing is clear – rehabilitation is advanced work. This book offers answers drawn from the research and experience of New Zealand practitioners across the field – it includes the learnings of those who work with offenders in prison and in the community, with men and women in separate programmes, with youth and with Māori and Pacific people. One contribution considers the legal question: since programmes are now shown to be effective, do offenders have a right to treatment?

Contents:

  • Introduction by Ken McMaster & David Riley (Eds)
  • The changing nature of interventions – David Wales & Nicola Tiller
  • Treatment of offending behaviour: Is it a legal right? – Kris Gledhill
  • Programme design: Getting it more right than wrong – Ken McMaster & Arthur Wells
  • Supervision – Sam Farmer & Nev Trainor
  • Do no harm: Equipping facilitators for competent practice – Sue Dark & Ken McMaster
  • Evaluation in Corrections: ‘Nothing works’ versus ‘What works’ – David Riley
  • Site implementation issues – Andrew Frost
  • Culture and offender rehabilitation in New Zealand: Implication for programme delivery and development – Armon Tamatea & Tansy Brown
  • Effective programmes for men who use family violence – Garth Baker
  • Interventions for women offenders – Lucy King
  • Youth offenders – Bronwyn Moth & Nikki Evans

To order your copy click here

Published on Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013, under Announcements, Offender work

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